The ‘Four-Legged City’ Where Street Dogs & Cats Are At Home

When your holiday zest for sightseeing bazaars and palaces begins to flag, and you turn into the nearest cafe for a much-needed sit down and restorative coffee, chances are several street dogs and cats will have got there before you and nabbed the best seats.
As you settle at a vacant table, a furry feline will in all likelihood settle on you. And in this city no-one is going to turn them out. Because you are in Istanbul, the ‘four-legged city’, where the free-roaming dogs and cats get cared for as well as the pampered pets inside the home.
The cafe owner emerges from the kitchen with dishes of food for his four-legged guests. The fishmonger next door is slicing up pieces of fish for the hopeful, patiently waiting outside.

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Local residents are putting out bowls of water and food next to the little shelters they’ve knocked together for the furries out on their own streets. And of course, there are rich pickings to be had for the enterprising in the bags of rubbish thrown on to the street.

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Reinvigorated by your coffee? Then head for Nişantaşı Sanat Parkı, otherwise known as ‘the Cat Park’. There are cats, cats and more cats everywhere you look. Hundreds, yes hundreds, of them. Unlike feral cats in the UK, these are completely habituated to people, and will return your attentions with happy purrs and affectionate nuzzles.

You may be puzzled by strange white boxes dotted about the city. These are ‘smart’ recycling boxes. Recycling with an unusual twist: the box rewards you for recycling your empty water bottle by dispensing cat and dog food to give to the animals.

Canines beyond the city limits where food opportunities are thin on the ground are not forgotten either. A van is sent out daily to Belgrade Forest with 1,000 kg of dry dog food. The driver honks the horn, the signal that breakfast has arrived. The dogs come running out of the trees.

That’s hunger dealt with. What about thirst? The city has installed fresh water stations especially for the 130,000 thirsty dogs and 165,000 thirsty cats free-roaming the city – that’s about as many street-dwelling felines and canines combined as there are human residents of Nottingham or Belfast.

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Pic from Phys.org

If any of these free-spirited furries get sick, no problem –  if they can’t get to one of the 6 health clinics (with a little help from the always willing humans), the VetBus will come to them.

There’s no doubt about it: Istanbul’s four-legged residents are done proud. You could say they own the city.

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A paradise present and past

What a paradise for these lucky animals, a paradise present and past. Dogs and cats have been documented on the streets of Istanbul for hundreds of years. “The dogs sleep in the streets, all over the city,” Mark Twain wrote after a visit in 1867. “They would not move, though the Sultan himself passed by.”

Why is it that in this city they are not just tolerated, but actively cared for? “They are the neighbourhood’s dogs [and cats]. They protect us and everyone loves them,” says resident Hamit Yilmaz Ozcan.

Sadly the same cannot be said of many other cities in the world. In the last few years alone we have heard of cities like Sochi, Beijing, and Rio de Janeiro’s horrific mass killings of street animals ahead of big sporting events. Other places like Cyprus and Bali also view the street animals as pests, and regularly cull them. ‘Cull’ of course is just officialese for ‘kill’. But killing it is nonetheless. In 2013, Romania’s capital Bucharest ordered euthanasia (another euphemism) of its 50,000 strays.

“The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates there are 200 million stray dogs worldwide. Countries such as Ukraine, Sri Lanka and Mexico have in the past, taken reduction measures [yet another euphemism to cloak the unpalatable truth] to control their large populations of stray dogs.” 

So what makes Istanbul so different, possibly unique?

The answer is, centuries of Islamic tradition in the Ottoman Empire, of which Istanbul was the capital and seat of power. The Ottomans took to heart the Qu’ran’s teaching that all animals were made by Allah. All animals are loved by Allah. All animals must be treated with kindness and compassion.

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“According to Islamic culture, people should avoid being unjust to others, and it places animals’ rights above human rights since it is possible to compensate for the wrongdoing to people by asking for their forgiveness; however, it is not possible with animals as they lack reason.” 

(Personally, I think it’s not that they lack reason, but that we don’t understand their language.)

“Prophet Muhammad told the story of two different women who lived long before his time. As he recounted, an evil women went to heaven because she gave water to a dog, while a good woman went to hell because she starved a cat to death.”

(Define ‘good woman’, I’d say. Starving a cat to death sounds pretty evil to me. But anyway, you get the drift.)

“Fearing this story, people in the past fed their animals before they sat down for meals and did not go to bed before they cleaned the animals in their barns and checked if they had water and feed. Moreover, the government punished those who carried barnyard fowls upside down or overloaded horses or donkeys, and people who harmed animals were alienated from their community in the Ottoman Empire.

“The Ottomans established foundations to feed street dogs, and wolves in the mountains, provide water for birds on hot summer days and treat storks with broken wings or injured horses. They also built birdhouses in the courtyards of buildings such as mosques, madrasahs and palaces and placed water pans on gravestones for birds.”

Even ‘worn out’ donkeys and horses, no longer fit to work, were not shot or abandoned as would have been, and often still is their fate elsewhere, but cared for until the end of their days.

Sad change in the 19th century

The people of Istanbul have always loved having the animals around – and who wouldn’t. The state though is a different matter. In the 19th century, the Ottomans, realising the image they were projecting to European powers was one of backwardness, decided to push beggars, orphans and the unemployed into forced labour or deportation. And at the same time made “systemic efforts to annihilate stray dogs within the wider picture of Ottoman modernizing reforms.”

In 1909, “although old Istanbul’s street dogs were very famous, the municipality collected all of them, ferried them to an island in the Marmara Sea and abandoned them. They were left with no food or clean water, and their cries were heard throughout the city. 

“The people who pitied them threw them food, but when all of these dogs died on the island, the residents of the city were disturbed by the smell of their corpses. The wars that broke out and the defeats of the empire following this incident were seen as a punishment for what was done to those animals.”

That sudden ruthless disregard for the centuries-old traditions of care and respect for the street dogs and cats continued right through the 20th century. Right up to the 1990s, officials were strewing poison around the city, consigning the animals to a cruel death.

In 2004 Turkey passed an Animal Protection Law

Everything changed again. The municipalities were forced to take a more humane approach. Instead of slaughter, an extensive neutering program was implemented by the VetBus and the clinics.

With rabies still endemic in Turkey, the thought of rabid animals roaming the busy streets of this ancient city is not one the municipality was prepared to countenance for a second, so the other important part of the program is vaccination. Under the Capture Neuter Vaccinate & Release program, CNVR, the dogs and cats are also chipped and given an ear tag so they can easily be identified as having been ‘done’ before they are returned to the street or square where they were found.

It’s a secret

The tons of food, the water stations, the recycle boxes, the clinics, the VetBus, the CNVR program – surely none of this can come cheap? The municipality refuses to say how much is being spent on the street dogs and cats of Istanbul. “If people knew how much money was spent on these services, maybe people would be more upset, but these figures are not disclosed,” says Yildirim, coordinator of the collective “Dort Ayakli Sehir” (Four-legged City).

But Turkey’s Agriculture and Forests Minister Bekir Pakdemirli did recently admit that between 2009 and 2018 his ministry expended 31 million Turkish lira (around $6 million) just contributing towards the budgets of local authorities across the country for their care of street animals.

Maybe still not quite such a paradise for the street dogs and cats after all? 

The best efforts of the CNVR program has only succeeded in keeping the stray feline and canine populations at a fairly constant level. Their numbers have not fallen over time as the municipality might have hoped and expected. Of course, there will always be some wily characters that escape the net and keep breeding.

But much sadder than that, according to animal welfare organisations on the ground:

“There is a high incidence of dog abandonment in Turkey. Pets are often bought on impulse, and frequently as gifts. But when cute little puppies grow into large dogs that need space, exercise and long-term care, many families simply abandon their pets to the streets or forests. Many abandoned dogs are pure breeds, like golden retrievers, that are temperamentally unfit to survive on the streets or in the wild.”

The self-same fate awaits cats:

“In Turkey everyday, thousands of puppies and kittens are sold in the pet-shops just like stuffed animals and most of them find themselves abandoned on the streets within a couple of months… Abandoned cats and dogs are everywhere. Sometimes people simply kick them out from their home right on the streets, sometimes they take a dog into a forest and leave him there so he can’t find his way back home, or even abandon him by the side of a motorway so he gets killed quickly.”

This little guy is one such victim. Only 40 days old, found all alone and whimpering in a ditch at the side of the road. Luckily he was rescued and put up for adoption. But there’s still a chance he could end up back on the street further down the line.

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Pic from Phys.org
Love for the street animals/casual, callous abandonment. How to reconcile the two?

Is it that the good people of Istanbul enjoy the pleasure the animals bring into their daily lives, and feel good giving food and some outdoor shelter, but don’t want the full responsibility of caring for them in their own home?

Or could it be that in today’s cosmopolitan city, while some still hold fast to the old traditions, others have discarded them as belonging to the past? That would be sad indeed.

From the centuries-old Ottoman Islamic ethic of respect and compassion, I believe there is much we and the world could learn in our attitudes towards all animals, great and small. Don’t you agree?


Please sign and share:

Petition to stop the poisoning of strays in Turkey’s capital, Ankara

Petition to end this tragedy in Turkey: dog starvation on a colossal scale.

Petition to stop neighbouring Jordan killing every street dog in the country

Petition to stop authorities in Benalmadena, Spain ruthlessly culling homeless cats

Petition to enforce ban on dog culling in Bangladesh

#AdoptDontShop  #PersonsNotProperty


Related posts

You Love Animals, Right? Ever Wondered Why Others Couldn’t Care Less?

You Love Animals, Right? Your Brain is Different from Those Who Don’t

What It’s Like To Be A Dog

A Cat, a Dog, or a Human – Which is Best for Bedtime Cuddles?

3 Genius Ways of Helping Rescue Dogs – & Cats – But Mainly Dogs!

Sources

With thanks – Longhaul Trekkers blog post – warmly recommend for entertaining info and fab pics of the cats of Istanbul

In Istanbul, fat cats are a good thing– check out the picture of Tombili and his statue. Seriously, do it!

Istanbul vets make city’s stray animals feel at home

BBC Religions: Islam

This Vending Machine Takes Bottles and Gives Food to Stray Dogs in Exchange

Managing Street Dogs and Cats in Turkey

Stray dog numbers spur state euthanasia plans

The Ottomans Exemplary Treatment of Street Animals

The state and the stray dogs in late Ottoman Istanbul

 

 

7 thoughts on “The ‘Four-Legged City’ Where Street Dogs & Cats Are At Home

  1. Thank you for this great blog post. Sadly, though, this is not true for all of Istanbul. Friends who live there tell quite some sad stories about mistreatment of animals, of atrocious incidents where especially dogs are beaten to death. But there is a glimmer of hope and it is wonderful that you spread it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Alexandra. Good to have info from people on the ground, though I wish it were better news. The petitions too reveal an appalling picture. There always will be three kinds of people wherever we find them – those who truly love animals, those who are indifferent, and those who are downright cruel. The Ottoman Islamic ethic has definitely past the last group by:( Nothing is ever as straight forward as it appears on the surface. I hope that came across in the last part of the post.

      Like

      1. Yes, it did!
        I forwarded your blog to one of my friends in Istanbul and here comes the answer:

        “It is true for some cafes and streets but not true for most of the parts of the city.
        I wish it was..
        Some people are nice to strays but the municipalities want to get rid of the strays.”

        Keep up the great work, together, one step at time, we are changing animal lives to the better 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Great piece. I saw the documentary Kedi awhile ago, it highlights the lives of a few of the cats in Istanbul, it is a great show, you should watch it if you can. The religion backgrounds were very interesting; the only thing I was taught about the animal-Christianity connection growing up was that the Bible says, in some random passage, that in the mornings, animals shall always be fed first, before humans. Of course it doesn’t elaborate that humans have twisted meaning to support personal agendas and have thus interpreted the reasoning as to fatten them up in torturous ways so that people can then eat them. And never does anyone mention that in the very beginning, in Genesis, in Eden (utopia), God gave us seeds as “meat”. So many have missed that, or more than likely, just ignore as it is all too inconvenient. You’d think people would be more willing to aspire to the perfect, compassionate society rather than make it hell for most beings. But, alas, the religion called Cafeteria Christians is what the majority embrace. Anyway, off my soapbox, loved the piece as always. Thanks, hon. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Thanks Stacey! I’ll look out for that documentary. Yes, I agree, people conveniently overlook that God gave Adam and Eve fruit-bearing trees for food in the perfect paradise that was the garden of Eden. But this is the verse that’s really done the damage throughout the ages: “And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.” Genesis 1.26 The Jains have a much better approach with ahimsa. “There is no quality of soul more subtle than non-violence and no virtue of spirit greater than reverence for life.” Perhaps we need a post on how religions compare in their treatment of animals! 💕

    Like

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