Cultured Meat – A Welsh Bacon Farmer’s Take

Cultured meat is the future. I’m sure of it. Even monolithic meat companies like Tyson Foods think so. And now here we have the view from the other end of the spectrum – small-scale Welsh farmer and traditionalist, Illtud Llyr Dunsford, otherwise known as Bob.

Illtud’s family has farmed animals in south Wales for more than 200 years.

“One animal in particular has a special place in my heart” he says “- the pig.”

He goes on:“We’d always salted our pork in the traditional Carmarthenshire method, encasing the animal in salt in a slate tray before hanging and air drying. Using traditional family recipes we’d also produce brawn and faggots. I guess it’s in the blood, my Auntie Ethel had a stall for years on Carmarthen Market selling faggots, her produce is the stuff of legend now, and the recipe is a closely guarded family secret.”
(Clearly when he talks of loving pigs, he means something very different from me.)
Drawing on that tradition, he founded Charcutier Ltd, an award-winning company producing niche artisan meats – heritage hand-salted bacons and hams.
His philosophy was to make products using every part of the pigs. As he so graphically puts it, “everything but the squeal”.

Illtud, who in a former life worked in the film industry (Harry Potter, Robin Hood, Dr. Who) also happens to be a Nuffield scholar. If you’ve been listening to The Archers recently, you’ll know all about the Nuffield Scholarship program. But if you’re not an addict of the soap like me, here is the lowdown:

The Nuffield Farm Scholarship program gives awards to successful applicants so they can “search out and bring back to farmers in the UK details of good and innovative agricultural husbandry, from different parts of the globe.”

And the best thing Illtud/Bob brought back from his trips to Ireland, France, Italy, Brazil, and the U.S. was his discovery of developments in cellular agriculture. This technology was completely new to him when he encountered it at the 1st International Symposium on Cultured Meat. The event was hosted by Maastricht University in the Netherlands, home of the very first $330,000 cultured meat burger which was unveiled, cooked and tasted in 2013.

It was at the symposium Illtud experienced his lightbulb moment (they call it a”Nuffield Moment” in the program) – the revelation that cellular agriculture really does offer a viable solution to all of the many serious problems meat production poses, whether it’s carried out on an industrial scale, or even on a small scale like his own family farm. His travels had exposed those problems surrounding ethics, the environment, sustainability, animal welfare, and the urgent need for the new and better methods technology is now able to provide. In his own words:

“I sat on the bench in the centre of the Belgian University town of Leuven — eating the most delicious fries which had been cooked in beef dripping — contemplating veganism. Like a dieter who promises that the evening blow-out meal before the diet starts will be the last of its kind, I didn’t hold up much hope that I would be turning vegan. However, having come from an agricultural background, raised in a tradition where I was at the heart of the rearing and processing of our own animals, I had never stopped and questioned the consumption of meat… I sat in that square the best part of the day, my head aching from the pressure of thinking. I was a man anguished by a moral dilemma. How could I, an advocate of traditional farming practices, heritage recipes, and processing methods, be even contemplating this new world?”

Illtud’s second “Nuffield Moment” was witnessing for himself the vast swathes of Amazonian rainforest laid waste for grazing cattle and growing livestock feed. Brazilian law stipulates that 80% of the Amazon must remain untouched by agriculture, but seeing at first hand the lack of enforcement of this law troubled him deeply. He left the Amazon shaken:

“I would never consider protein production in the same way again. The reality of the pressure of feeding the 9bn by 2050 was becoming ever greater. Though traditional agriculture held some of the answer, it was becoming clearly obvious that if we followed that path alone, our planet, and its resource might survive 2050, but not for the generations of 11.2bn projected for 2100… Deforestation is a global issue, its impact is global and the reality is that any protein production we support, even adding milk to our tea, becomes of itself an environmental act. “

The last leg of Illtud’s trip took him to the World Pork Expo in Des Moines, Iowa. It was as horrible as it sounds. He was shocked by the aggressive commercialism and poor animal welfare standards of the large-scale pork industry, in full view right there before his eyes.

Feeling thoroughly depressed he set off for his final destination, California for New Harvest’s first conference. What a difference! The mood was upbeat. Here was real hope of a truly sustainable future for meat production, and not just meat. Other ‘animal products’ too.

cultured-meat-resized

 “The field is growing immensely; panelists delegates and exhibitors at the conference included a raft of companies who are looking at a range of products. They are predominantly developing products that are specifically animal derived [cultured from animal cells]: Gelzen (gelatine), Modern Meadow (leather), Muufri/Perfect Day (milk), Spiber (spider silk), Pembient (rhino horn) and Sothic (horseshoe crab blood) and span a range of applications, both food, clothing, and also medicine. [But] cultured meat is still held as the holy grail of products…”

Sad to say, back home in Wales Illtud has not yet abandoned his hand-salted bacons and hams. But the great news is, he is pushing forward with biotech. He’s founded Cultivate, a hub for discussing developments in cellular agriculture. And our farming pioneer has taken over a new start-up called, would you believe, Cellular Agriculture Ltd, with a view to making his very own cultured meat.

This has to be of huge significance for British farming.

Hopefully it won’t be too long before folk up and down the country will be tucking into Illtud’s bacon and ham cultured from pig cells, proudly labelled “Made in Wales”, rather than the cruel kind that comes from “everything but the squeal”.

Let’s just hope cellular agriculture here and in the States develops fast enough to halt the devastation of the planet, and the slaughter of billions upon billions more innocent lives.


Postscript

Interesting to compare.

es-2011-00130u_0006

Read more

Sources

What Does This Artisanal Meat Producer Think About Cultured Meat? – written for Medium by David Leibowitz of New Harvest

Charcutier Ltd – WordPress

Related posts

Which is Your Burger of Choice for the Future of Food

This is the Future – 5 Awesome People Make Fabulous ‘Post-Animal’ Food

Sink Your Teeth into this Meaty News!

Futurology Promises More Hopes than Fears for the Animals & the Planet

Futurology says you really can have too many bees!

Even the most indifferent to environmental issues and our native flora and fauna would have to be blind and deaf not to have registered the torrent of bad news about the dramatic and worrying decline in bee population numbers over the last few years.

So how could you possibly have too many bees?

We know of course that bee colonies are trucked all over the USA to pollinate crops as each comes into flower each year.

pear-1264581_960_720

But until I came to write this post, I for one was completely unaware that right now millions of bees are being shipped around the globe to work their pollination magic. Here in the UK it seems we import 40,000-50,000 colonies each year. And global bee commerce continues to expand.

This is a problem for at least two reasons:

  • The colonies – provided by a handful of global suppliers – are screened for diseases and parasites, but that screening is not foolproof. And the imported bees hosting pathogens can and do spread their unwanted ‘guests’ to the local populations with disastrous results. “The effects include killing bees outright, or harming their ability to learn, which is crucial in finding food. In Argentina, imported parasites are driving native species to extinction.”¹ As the trade exports the industrious little insects to ever more locations, the danger of harmful effects on native bees and food security increases.
  • As well as putting their local cousins at risk, the imported bees, by pollinating invasive non-native plant species, are likely to accelerate their dispersion with unknowable effects on local biodiversity.

So I guess the problem isn’t exactly having too many bees per se, but too many bees on the move carrying pathogens to all corners of the world. It’s ironic but perturbing that an industry that’s mushroomed in response to an ever-widening pollinator shortage, will likely itself exacerbate the downward trend.

A big conservation problem then. One of five recently identified as global environmental risks by an international team of experts in science communication, research and horizon scanning. Horizon scanning (otherwise known as Futurology or Future Studies) is a collaborative process of assembling all available data in a particular field to identify future trends, both positive and negative.

While in an ideal world the crystal ball would reveal zero future environmental risks, it’s good to know at least that this particular expert team – undertaking their horizon-scanning in the field of species and ecosystems pinpointed just 5 key risks, but twice as many hopeful opportunities. And as I’m keen to make this week a week of hope, I’ll list the remaining 4 risks in brief so we can get on to the good stuff.

1   Sand scarcity I don’t know about you, but this is one possible problem I wouldn’t have imagined. “Sand is used in a diverse range of industries and as the human population increases so does the demand for sand. Impacts of sand mining include loss of species, degradation of habitats and social conflict”.

2  Border fences affecting wild animals The impenetrable wall between the USA and Mexico promised by President Trump would adversely affect desert bighorn sheep, the endangered North American jaguar, the ocelot – now down to the last 50 in southern Texas and the cougar (pictured here).cougar-718092_960_720

In total it’s estimated that 111 endangered species could suffer as a result of Trump’s wall, as well as 108 species of migratory birds.” Sadly the trend is not confined to the USA. The increased use of border fencing in Europe and elsewhere will have similar detrimental effects on the movement, migration and survival of wild animal species.²

3  Changes in waste management affecting wild animals Another trend that wouldn’t spring immediately to mind – closing or covering rubbish dumps. That might sound like a positive, but will be bad news for wildlife scavengers habituated to this ready food supply.

4  Wind speeds at the sea surface are increasing data indicates, and so is the frequency of gales. The effect on seabirds and migrating marine animals is an unknown, but unlikely to be beneficial.

Bad news is always unwelcome I know. But even the bad can have its good side. If it throws the spotlight on to a problem, we can start looking for solutions. Take science’s revelation about the damage to marine life from plastic microbeads. The data that surfaced in 2010 was troubling to say the least, but bringing it to light did bring about quite speedy international action in the form of bans on their use.

Now that’s out the way we can, as promised, get to the good stuff – 10 new conservation opportunities opened up to us by advances in science and technology:

1  A new biological discovery: strains of Symbodinium (unicellular algae) found in coral reefs are resistant to heat and could hopefully be manipulated to protect reefs from the bleaching effect of rising temperatures in the ocean.

coral-reef-474052_960_720

2  An underwater robot called COTSbot has been very successful at controlling the crown-of-thorn starfish responsible for 40% of the damage to the Great Barrier Reef in the last 30 years. Robotics offer the prospect of more environmental wins. Watch COTSbot in action below.

3  The portable 3D-printed electronic ‘dogs’ nose, bizarre as it sounds, works even better than the real thing. It will provide a major new asset for sniffing out illegal wildlife goods, especially at border crossings, and offers the potential to disrupt major black market trade routes. That would be huge.

4  As a result of advances in genetic screening and engineering bacteria and fungi can now be used for biological pest control and growth stimulation treatments, averting the need to use artificial chemicals that harm biodiversity.

5  Ah, we’ve hit a snag. With this one it seems like risks and opportunities might be fairly equally balanced. We’re talking floating wind farms. Right now the biggest in the world is being constructed off the coast of Scotland. Though more efficient in supplying green energy than land-based, and good for fish seeking a refuge, they would be no better than their land-based counterparts at avoiding collateral damage to birds in flight. Plus there’s a chance they could entangle marine mammals.

6  The bionic leaf that makes fuel out of sunlight and water. Forget fitting solar panels to your roof. Just get your bionic leaf and make your own ready-to-use biomass. Watch the video to find out how.

7  Lithium-air batteries. Yet another technology entirely new to me. If produced commercially, these batteries could revolutionise the clean energy industry by enabling electric cars to run on a battery a fifth of the cost and a fifth of the weight of batteries currently on the market. This means you could travel from London to Edinburgh – just over 400 miles – on a single charge. Right now an electric car can only drive between 50 and 80 miles per charge. If you’re interested in the science, click here.

8  Reverse photosynthesis uses the sun’s energy to break down rather than build up plant material. It’s potential? To transform the production of biofuels and plastics and reduce fossil fuel use and carbon emissions.

9  Carbon capture involves dissolving the carbon dioxide in water and injecting it into basalt rock, which is plentiful all around the globe. Once in the rock it undergoes a natural process. The basalts (volcanic rock) react with the gas-in-solution to form carbonate minerals. Hey presto, limestone! In the Iceland Carbfix project it took just two years for the  solution to solidify. Compare that with the hundreds or even thousands of years that was predicted. Only the lack of political will is holding this one back. Grrr.

10  bitcoin-1813507__340Blockchain technologyBy allowing digital information to be distributed but not copied, blockchain technology created the backbone of a new type of internet. Originally devised for the digital currency, Bitcoin, the tech community is now finding other potential uses for the technology.”

In the environmental field, these could be: “establishing a currency market for trading carbon credits, improving supply chain traceability (e.g. for sustainable fish) and tracking illegal wildlife trade.”

Which all goes to prove there are few conservation issues for which science and technology cannot find an answer. Futurology is right to see the almost limitless opportunities they offer.

But it’s not human ingenuity that is ever in question. Humankind’s will to implement preventions and solutions most certainly is, both at political and individual level.

The good news is, we have the power in our hands to act at both levels. In politics we can use our vote for the planet. We can also throw your support behind organisations actively engaged in protecting nature and lobbying governments or challenging them in courts of law.

In the USA for example, we have the altogether wonderful Center for Biological Diversity and the Sierra Club amongst others.

Here in the UK, we can support the Wildlife Trusts. We can be sure they will do all in their power to keep our government in line with the National Ecosystem Asessment. We can also join the Ecosystems Knowledge Network. They greatly value individuals’ input.

On a purely individual level Friends of the Earth has a wealth of ideas and tips for living an eco-friendly life which is well worth exploring.

It is so beyond time to stop ravaging the Earth in the pursuit of our own selfish interests. We are currently pursuing a path that is not only irresponsible and disrespectful, but ultimately self-defeating. The real interests of the human race lie not in the rape and pillage of our precious planet and all the life in it, but in due reverence, regaining a sense of wonder, and careful loving stewardship. We can do it.

After all, there is only one Earth.

“I will not dishonor my soul with hatred,
but offer myself humbly as a guardian of nature,
as a healer of misery,
as a messenger of wonder,
as an architect of peace.
I will honor all life,
wherever and in whatever form it may dwell,
on Earth my home,
and in the mansions of the stars.”

– Diane Ackerman

Read about last year’s projections here

¹Imported bees pose risk to UK’s wild and honeybee population – The Guardian

²Building Walls – Purr and Roar. Excellent post on this topic I would heartily recommend. Also Border Fences Aimed at Stopping Immigrants are Killing Wildlife – Take Part

 

Source

15 risks and opportunities to global conservation – Fauna & Flora International

Related posts

Hope for the Animals & the Planet?

There is Always Hope for the Animals & the Planet

Ten Fascinating Ways Technology is Saving Animals

How Drones Might Just Save Our Endangered Animals & the Planet

 

 

Eight Women Changing the World for Animals 3

3rd in series about eight remarkable women spearheading the battle for Animal Rights in their varied fields of science, art, law and politics, to celebrate the forthcoming International Animal Rights Day on Dec 10th

Today The Artist
“The profound disconnect between our dominant urban world and the natural world, including nonhuman animals, is a chasm that must be rectified…”
Elizabeth Marshall, Canadian social justice, environment and animal activist – filmmaker.

For Liz Marshall it was clear from the word go how driven her life would be. She always wanted to change the world. A letter she wrote age 8:

Dear Prime Minister,

I am 8 years old and in Grade A. My name is Elizabeth Marshall, and I am writing to tell you that I think that are government should get more for the poor pople. Than buying guns and starting wars. because guns kill people. and you should help poor people because I think it is not right because look at all these nice people and we don’t want to kill them. and Please tell the other governments to stop the wars so it can be Peace in the world. Please do it. From Elizabeth.

Spellings and punctuation all her own -not bad for an 8 year old – and all finished off with a cute smiley face drawing and a speech bubble saying “hi there”.

Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau replied: Dear Elizabeth, It’s nice to hear from you again [bold mine]. There was clearly no stopping this young lady.

Liz on life during and after film school:

“I began my career in the 1990s, focusing my lens and my passion on human stories which led to an array of life changing projects shot around the globe in war torn, developing and developed countries. In the mid 2000s, I became very interested in environmental issues, but also in long form storytelling, which led me to make my two feature length documentaries: ‘Water On The Table’

and ‘The Ghosts in Our Machine’

“My partner in life is a long time animal rights activist, and she inspired me to pay closer attention to animal issues. I have been an animal advocate for as long as I can remember, but I really credit Lorena as one who tapped me on the shoulder, and urged me to look closely, as a filmmaker, at the animal question.”

Ghosts in Our Machine follows activist and photojournalist JoAnne McArthur as she goes behind the scenes to document what is hidden from public view, the enslavement of “animals en mass for food, fashion, research, and entertainment,” and the reality of their suffering. They are the invisible ghosts in the machine of human society.

But telling the story is only half the battle. A film can only change the world for animals if it gets massive exposure.

And massive exposure “Ghosts” has had. Even by the start of 2015, as well as being aired on Canadian television, the film had been screened in 1,816 cities, 92 countries, and 6 continents. It’s won 14 international awards and nominations, and notched up 140 reviews and interviews in countries around the world.

A key ingredient of its success is Liz’s gentle approach. Yes, it does include scenes that are hard to watch, but they are balanced with beautiful individual stories: abused sow Julia and her 8 piglets; worn out Fanny the cow and her new calf; and Abbey the lab beagle, all rescued and now in sanctuaries, enjoying the safe, contented lives to which they have a right.

To change the way people see the world, you want them to keep looking, not turn away. So Liz engages the viewer by revealing different animals – animals normally only thought of as commodities – as real and individual persons.

How very effective the film is as a tool for animal advocacy can be gauged by the support it’s received from Farm Sanctuary, Mercy For Animals, PETA, NEAVS, Compassion Over Killing, and yes, Lori Marino’s Kimmela Center. All these advocacy organisations immediately saw its potential as a force for change.

Liz and JoAnne know they’re making a difference with their incredible work. Both say they regularly hear from people who’ve been deeply moved by “Ghosts” and have changed their way of life as a result.

But Liz isn’t resting on her laurels. She recently released the official trailer for her next documentary MEAT THE FUTURE. In it Liz follows the work of Dr Uma Valeti and his company Memphis Meats, developing cultured meat – healthier than the flesh of farmed animals, a more viable option for feeding the rapidly increasing global population, and environmentally-friendly. Above all, it has the potential to save billions of animals from a life of suffering, pain, fear, and death in the slaughterhouse.

Liz Marshall, the remarkable woman passionately changing the world one film at a time.

Add your name to the Declaration of Animal Rights here

Go vegan for the animals here

 

Sources

Liz Marshall About.me

Meet the Incredible Filmmaker Helping to Change Our Perception of Animals & the Environment – One Green Planet

The Ghost in Our Machine – Faunalytics

Meat the Future – The Good Food Institute

Related posts

Eight Women Changing the World for Animals 1

Eight Women Changing the World for Animals 2

Eight Women Changing the World for Animals 4

A Night at the Grand Beedapest Hotel. Be the Voice for Bees

On behalf of Taylors of Harrogate may I welcome you to the Grand Beedapest Hotel!

Here at reception can we just check your credentials before you sign in? Forgive the impertinence but we do have to count your legs. Six? Perfect. Now if you wouldn’t mind trying us with a little buzzing? Music to the ears. Come right in. Please avail yourself of all our five star luxury facilities.

Maybe you would like a dip in the Peppermint Leaf Pool before dining in the Rose Lemon restaurant? We’ve given you the Sour Cherry bedroom. I hope that meets with your requirements. The gym? Next to the pool, ground floor. Enjoy your stay, Madam!

I particularly love the bees ‘using’ the gym in this little video!

This is all frivolous fun, nonsense of course, but nonsense with a deadly serious purpose. The famous tea company Taylors of Harrogate is using their colourful quirky Grand Beedapest Hotel (inspired, you guessed, by the Wes Anderson movie) to launch their campaign to raise awareness of the bee’s importance to the world, which is out of all proportion to the little insect’s humble size. Because all our buzzy little friends not lucky enough to be in residence at Harrogate’s Grand Beedapest are in trouble.

Bees have a problem

populationsThere can’t be anyone who isn’t aware of the frightening decline in bee populations all over the world. Taylors puts it down to the expansion of urban areas, shrinking flower meadows and natural habitats, and pollution. But perhaps not wishing to look ‘political’ or tread on powerful toes, they omit to specify The Big One – pesticides and in particular neonicotinoids*.

Greenpeace has no such qualms about proffering the information: they tell us that biologists have found more than 150 different chemical residues in bee pollen, a veritable “pesticide cocktail” **- a tipple most definitely NOT on offer in the Rose Lemon restaurant of the Grand Beedapest.

Unfortunately the bees and their supporters are up against Bayer, Dow, Monsanto and DuPont, four monstrous megacorporations making vast profits from pushing these chemicals, who have a stranglehold over almost the entire world market for pesticides (and genetically modified  plants and seeds). In 2012, Monsanto for instance, reported net sales of approximately 13.5 billion U.S. dollars. Monstrous in their size, monstrous in their power and influence, and monstrous in the damage they are wreaking on the planet.

Why the bees’ plight matters

If saving the bees for their threatened selves is not enough, nor even because they are the ecological ‘canary in the coal mine’ that gives warning of the degradation of the natural environment, let us at least save them for our own survival.

bee-1401710__180It’s not just the ingredients of Taylors’ teas that are at risk, important as they no doubt are. Three quarters of our food crops rely on pollination by that hard-working insect and other insects, also badly affected by pesticides. If we love almonds, apples, broccoli, asparagus, cantaloupes, cucumbers, pumpkins, blueberries, watermelons, cranberries, and cherries … and on and on, and want to keep on eating them, we really need to take action for the bees.

“Believe it or not, you have a bee to thank for every one in three bites of food you eat” Greenpeace. No doubt more if you’re vegan.

So what does the world need to do?

Easily said, but imperative to act on:

  • Ban the use of the seven worst pesticides
  • Preserve wild habitat
  • Turn from industrial to ecological (i.e. organic) farming – which encompasses both of the first two. But more on that in another post.

What is the situation vis à vis neonicotinoid pesticides here in the UK?

The EU imposed restrictions on the use of neonicotinoids in 2013. The UK’s Tory government voted against the restrictions – well, there’s a surprise. Nonetheless the EU ruling does still apply to us until Brexit is completed, which will be another two years after Article 50 is activated. Theresa May’s government says it will uphold the restrictions post Brexit completion, provided “science proves them necessary.” Hmm. Defra doesn’t exactly have a good track record when it comes to basing its policies on scientific evidence – ask the poor badgers.

Unsurprisingly, the National Farmers Union has opposed the neonicotinoid ban from the word go. We have them to thank as usual for their vigorous lobbying against, it seems, all measures intended to protect our wildlife and the environment. (There is a get-out clause in the EU neonicotinoid restrictions, which NFU members have been happy to exploit. In ’emergencies’ farmers can apply for a licence for a temporary exemption from the ban.)

So what IS the science?

The results of a recent study have just been published in the Journal Proceedings of the Royal Society:

  • Neonicotinoids cut live sperm in male bees by 40%
  • They cut the lifespan of drones by one third
  • 32% of drones exposed to these chemicals are dead before they can reach sexual maturity at 14 days old

And previous studies have already shown a marked detrimental effect on both bumblebee and honeybee queens from exposure to these pesticides

“This could have severe consequences for colony fitness, as well as reduce overall genetic variation within honeybee populations,” the scientists concluded.

What are other countries doing?

  • France, responding to overwhelming public concern, has just proved itself a true friend to bees by becoming the first nation to pass a complete ban on the use of neonicotinoids with effect from 2020
  • Closer to home, forward-thinking Dorset County Council has adopted a ‘pollinator strategy’ and has banned these chemicals from all its own land. Let’s hope similar strategies will be brought into play around the country
  • And in Canada, Friends of the Earth is challenging in court that government’s decision to licence their use

And then there are the glyphosates

Glyphosates are herbicides used to kill plants, not insects so what is the problem with herbicides? Well, bees’ awesome navigational skills are legendary, aren’t they? But in a study last year, it was shown that glyphosates like Monsanto’s Roundup impair bees’ spatial learning process, and so disorientate their flight trajectories. That cannot be good.

What can we do?

The obvious and simple thing we can all do is never to use pesticides and herbicides in our own gardens. The butterflies, birds, hedgehogs, frogs and toads, as well as bees will thank us.

At national level, we need to bring people power into play. The NFU has the Tories in its pocket. So we need to raise our voices even louder against these deadly chemicals that are threatening our food security and decimating our insect life, our biodiversity and our countryside. Be a voice for bees!

Ask your MP to back the ban on bee-harming pesticideshere and here

And contact your MP again here

More actions for beeshere

Petition to sign here

And another here

And here

And please share. Thanks so much

 

(*Neonicotinoids exposure most frequently occurs when bees consume pollen and nectar from crops grown using neonicotinoid coated seeds or from dust created by pesticide coated seeds during planting.)

Updates

2nd August 2016 Monsanto’s superweed saga is only getting worse  Take Part

9th August 2016 Airforce Tries Killing Weeds with Light Beams not Pesticides – Take Part

18th August 2016 ‘Bee-friendly’ gardens are finally becoming safe for bees Take Part

20th August 2016 UK Government Finds Link Between Insecticides & Bee Decline – Care2

25th August 2016 Brexit – What next for bees and the fight against neonicotinoid pesticides

12th September 2016 Scientist find a new way neonicotinoids are killing off bees – ZME Science

Another amazing video to watch – bee-inspired artwork at Kew

When Bees Go Extinct, These Ten Foods Will Follow – One Green Planet

Related posts

The Gross Bee Happiness Program

Make Your Own Seed Bombs for Bees

 

Sources

**University of California apiculturist Eric Mussen

Taylors Tea

Bees, Neonicotinoids and the EU

Greenpeace: Save the Bees

Friends of the Earth: Why are bees celebrating in Dorset and France?

The Guardian: Leading insecticide cuts bee sperm by almost 40%

The Ecologist: Glyphosates impair bees’ spatial learning

Bumblebee Conservation Trust

The Soil Association: Ban neonics

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save